Which British Official Signed The 1900 Buganda Agreement

By April 15, 2021 Uncategorized No Comments

However, with the signing of the 1900 Agreement, land was allocated to Kabaka, its family members and its leaders, as civil servants and also as individuals. The land issue was addressed in Article 15, which estimated the total area of land in Buganda at 19,600 square miles. But the agreement also stipulated that if a survey were to be conducted, and it was found that Buganda had less than 19,600 square miles, “then the part of the country that must be entrusted to Her Majesty`s Government will be reduced to the extent by the lack found in the estimated area.” After the agreement came into force, the country was divided in Buganda to Mailo and Kronland. Mailo Land belonged to the von Buganda government and its officials, while the Crown belonged to the protectorate government. The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda,[5] and signed, among others, by Mr. Katikiro Apollo Kagwa, on behalf of Kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), then a young child, and Sir Harry Johnston on behalf of the British colonial government. 10. To support The Kabaka of Uganda in the government of its people, it may appoint three local state officers, with the sanction and approval of Her Majesty`s representative in Uganda (without the sanction of which such appointments are not valid) – A Prime Minister, also known as Katikiro; a head of justice; and a treasurer or income controller of Kabaka. He has to pay these officials $300 a year. Their salaries are guaranteed by Her Majesty`s Government with funds from the Ugandan protectorate. The Kingdom of Uganda is subject to the same customs rules, Porter Regulations, etc., which can be introduced with Her Majesty`s agreement for the Ugandan protectorate in general, which can be described as external taxation in one sense, but no other internal taxation, with the exception of the shelter tax, is imposed on the indigenous peoples of Uganda province without kabaka`s agreement. which is guided in this case by the majority of votes on its original council. The Uganda Herald newspaper of August 14, 1914 reproduces the oath: “I Daudi Chwa, I swear that I will serve our sovereign lord King George V well and truly in Kabaka`s office in Buganda, and I will do well to all kinds of people according to the law and the use of the protectorate of Uganda, without fear or favor, affection of goodwill.

This is how God helps me. The British wanted not only to be the masters of the kingdom and its people, but also to have a say in the next Kabaka. After the death of Kabaka, his successor was elected by a majority of votes in the Lukiiko Council or the Original Council.

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